One-a-week Photo Challenge: POP!

Today is a balmy, snow-covered −11°C, with a predicted low of −23°C tonight. Let’s go out with a POP of summer colour for the final prompt of this challenge! I took this image in June at a local plant nursery and gave it an oil painting-type effect.Thanks to Wild Daffodil and nanacathydotcom for running the challenge. I look forward to contributing to the Monthly Meet-Up next year!

Advertisements

Window

I love photographing windows, doors and gates. What lies beyond them? Where do they lead? They’re like portals to another world – mysterious, beckoning.

It was difficult to choose from amongst my collection for this week’s One-a-week Photo Challenge prompt, Window. I have images from old cabins and sheds, stately homes, ruined castles, humble brick abodes. Stained glass is another of my interests, so I’ve photographed my fair share of leaded windows in chapels, churches and cathedrals. These would have been a bit obvious, so for this challenge, I opted for the quaint and rustic.

A cosy cat at a Lake Ontario home • Along the Mississauga Waterfront Trail, 2007

Wildflower bouquet on my cottage bedroom windowsill • Muskoka, 2016

Patio café • Bracebridge, 2014

Lunching at this charming tearoom is an annual summer tradition • Gravenhurst, 2008

Chappell House, The Riverwood Conservancy • Mississauga, 2017

By the lake • Muskoka, 2016

Although I participated in only a few of the weekly prompts, I enjoyed them very much. Thanks to Wild Daffodil and nanacathydotcom for this year-long challenge!

Regal

Long ago at a local zoo (using a basic camera with limited zoom), I photographed this very proud and royal looking male blue or Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus). With his flamboyant plumage in gemstone shades of sapphire, emerald, turquoise and gold, the peacock is a fitting subject for this week’s One-a-week Photo Challenge prompt, Regal.

Native to India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan, the Indian peafowl is associated with deities in Hinduism and Buddhism and was considered a royal guardian and a symbol of paradise in India, Babylonia and Persia. Ancient Greeks believed these birds were immortal, an idea adopted by early Christians who used them to depict eternal life. The ocelli (‘eyes’) of a peafowl’s train have come to represent the all-seeing god and the heavens studded with the sun, moon and stars. Although the strutting of the peacock to display his magnificent train is a sign of pride and vanity in some cultures, in others the bird represents creativity and joy, with the quills being a metaphor for a writer’s inspiration.

The peafowl was introduced to the rest of the world, first by the upper classes as beautiful and entertaining symbols of their wealth and status, and eventually to zoos. In the Middle Ages, peafowl were considered a gustatory delicacy. Plucked and roasted birds would be presented at the feast table redressed in their feathers as if to appear alive. Apparently, they were coarse, tough and bad-tasting and were thought to cause indigestion and ‘bad humours’. Ah, well, if one has the money…

The term for a group of peafowl is bevy, but also muster, party or – most appropriate – ostentation!

The peacock lends a royal theme to this rich display of colour, form and texture: opal, garnet, amethyst, onyx and smokey quartz gems, a peacock-hued bead necklace dotted with gold, sumptuous furs and fabrics, fine stationery and a peacock-painted china cup.

Rusted!

These two photos belong together because they were taken on the same day in the same place, and I couldn’t pick just one for this week’s One-a-week Photo Challenge prompt, Rust!

The images are of the tool shed attached to our family’s cottage, built in 1914 by my 18-year-old grandfather with guidance from his wheelchair-bound father, a former carpenter and jack-of-all-trades Who Knew Things.

The door’s hardware is original (its skeleton key is equally rusty!), and these old tools have been lovingly used by generations of gardeners.

Photographing the door was a challenge in itself, as the knob is closer to the eye (and camera lens) than the keyhole. Previous attempts resulted in either one or the other being drastically out of focus. Using advice from my photographer sister on dealing with depth of field, I managed to get this image. It’s not perfect, but I’m happy with it, and it’s a nice memento of a cherished place.

Please check out nanacathydotcom and Wild Daffodil for more rusty images!

Shadows

Just sneaking in under the wire for this week’s One-a-week Photo Challenge!

The week’s prompt has been Shadow. Of course, I couldn’t take that literally, so here’s my interpretation based on a Book of Shadows. This one happens to be a chapter heading from the wonderful Solitary Witch: The Ultimate Book of Shadows for the New Generation by Silver RavenWolf, whose many talents include a blog here on WordPress.

Many of the objects in my photo have appeared in previous posts, particularly those of October 2016, so this image also represents shadows of things past!

Thanks to nanacathydotcom and Wild Daffodil for this challenge. I’m looking forward to the next prompt, Rust!