It’s All Cool

Time has flown in more ways than one. Here we are halfway through summer, and today is the one year anniversary of this blog! I haven’t been able to write much in the last few weeks, and I know I’ve missed a lot. Things have been happening – things I needed to take care of – but now they’re done, and it’s all cool.

A major project has been revitalizing my Etsy shop. I chose a fresh new name, thereby uniting my shop, blog and Facebook page with a single identity. After careful consideration, I finally settled on Gillyflower Faire, which resonates with me on multiple levels: it’s a little bit archaic, a term for a marketplace, a nod to the Wee Folk, and a description (hopefully) of my handmade baubles. So, I said a fond farewell to Wood So Wild, and set about the many tasks necessary to incorporate this change.

I’ve added many new listings to the shop, including a line of beaded jewellery. The beaded pieces feature genuine gemstones – each chosen for a specific meaning – or wood or glass seed beads, accented with sterling silver and other metals. The styles are sleek and uncomplicated – the type of jewellery I like to wear. And I enjoy working in themes, so I’ve done a few chakra/rainbow pieces, evil eye talismans, and even some using Canadian gems to celebrate this country’s 150th birthday! Here you see just a few examples; there are many more to come.

This flurry of change and activity, combined with the sultry summer heat and the lack of air conditioning at home and in my now-defunct car, has left me in a sweat. My internal temperature control has been broken for years, and now, at this stage of life, it takes very little (stress, or any ambient temperature above 0° C) to turn me into a raging inferno. My friends and co-workers, being kind souls, tell me that when I’m in the grips of a hot flash, I don’t actually show it – aside from my frantic fanning of any item within reach – but I don’t see, or feel, how that can possibly be. You ladies of a certain age know precisely what I mean.

I’ve written before about a few items I keep handy to combat those uncomfortable moments. I continue to use arrowroot powder, either as-is or scented with a few drops of essential oils, as a herbal body powder. Arrowroot powder, also known as arrowroot flour or starch, is made from the powdered rhizomes of several types of tropical plants, notably Maranta arundinacea. It was once used to treat poison arrow wounds, hence the name, and is used as a food thickener as well as in cosmetics. Natural and safe, lightweight and silky, it’s the perfect alternative to cornstarch or talc. Arrowroot powder is inexpensive and found at bulk food and grocery stores.

The batch I made this summer has a fresh, invigorating herbal fragrance and uses essential oils known for their antiseptic properties (lavender, thyme) to combat nasty, sweat-loving bacteria, as well as ones reputed to relieve menopausal symptoms (clary sage, grapefruit). If you can get the shaker top off and on again, go ahead and reuse an empty baby powder bottle. I found 4 oz. plastic shakers at one of my favourite suppliers, Voyageur Soap & Candle Co. Here’s my recipe:

Talc-free Herbal Body Powder

  • small container with shaker lid
  • arrowroot powder
  • essential oils of lavender, Roman chamomile, clary sage, white thyme and pink grapefruit, or use your own favourite combination

Fill container halfway with arrowroot powder. Add 5 to 6 drops of each essential oil. Cover top of container and shake to combine. Fill the bottle with more arrowroot and snap on the lid. Shake thoroughly. Use as a body powder, avoiding eyes.

Another way to beat the heat is a cooling body mist. I found this recipe on Pinterest and dressed up my bottle with snowflake stickers. This lovely-smelling mixture contains soothing, skin-loving witch hazel, which constricts blood vessels to create a cooling sensation that lasts for several minutes on the skin. It’s especially good on hot, tired feet. You can keep the mist at room temperature or in the refrigerator for an extra icy blast.

Peppermint Mist Cooling Spray

  • 2 oz. glass spray bottle
  • 2 tbsp distilled water
  • 2 tbsp witch hazel
  • 4 drops peppermint essential oil
  • 4 drops lavender essential oil

Combine water, witch hazel and essential oils in bottle, add cap and shake thoroughly before each use. Do not use on the face.

Changes

I’ve been making a few changes in my life lately and am in the midst of considering others. I can’t believe it’s been more than two months since I started my second part-time job. It’s challenging and I’m enjoying it, but the additional schedule, including dashing straight from one job to the other several days a week, leaves precious little time for much else these days. I’m rethinking my presence on Facebook and must find a way to devote more time to my Etsy shop as well as take care of all the other things on my to-do list.

One thing that won’t change is my dedication to this blog. Some of you may have noticed in recent comments that I’ve switched my WordPress public display name from Wood So Wild to gillyflower. Over the last ten months, my blog has developed its own character, separate from my Etsy persona, and I would dearly love to change the site address, too, to reflect this. But WordPress doesn’t make that easy – or free – according to what I’ve read, so I’ll have to research that further. Have any of you changed your site name (e.g. http://www.gillyflowerfaire.wordpress.com), and how did you go about it?

With all this and more on my mind, May’s theme is Changes.

The other day, I picked up a sandalwood stretch bead bracelet. It was okay-looking but a bit too big, and the thin elastic looked as if it wouldn’t endure more than one wearing. Plus, I wasn’t keen on the cheap base metal charm or rhinestones. (I’ve saved the two genuine ruby fuchsite beads for another project.) I really just bought the thing for the fragrant wooden beads. So, just like Lydia and her ugly hat in Pride and Prejudice, I took it apart and made (what I think is) a prettier one!

Before

After

I used the following components, most of them available from Michael’s:

• 49 strand Beadalon™ 0.46 mm bright bead stringing wire
• 7 mm sandalwood beads
• 8 mm turquoise-dyed howlite beads
• 6 mm silver-plated spacer beads
• 5 mm and 3 mm silver-plated beads to finish the ends of the bracelet
• #2 silver-plated crimp tubes
• 18 gauge, 5/32” (4.19 mm) stainless steel chainmaille jump ring
• 12 mm silver-plated lobster clasp

Instructions on making jewellery with stringing wire and crimps are all over the ’net, so I won’t include them here. However, here are a few tips (some of them optional) in case you want to try something like this for yourself:

To accommodate the larger size of the beads on the wrist, I made the bracelet about half to three quarters of an inch longer than I would normally wear • I prefer using saw-cut chainmaille rings – a specialty purchase – in my jewellery because they’re more robust than regular jump rings and close beautifully without the need for soldering; I file the seam using a tiny round jeweller’s file for a virtually invisible closure • Chainmaille pliers are an excellent choice for jewellery-making because they don’t have teeth to mar metal surfaces, but they’re also not usually found at regular craft stores • My crimping pliers (Mighty Crimp) from Michael’s don’t secure the tiny tubes well enough, so I used needle nose pliers to tighten them securely, which resulted in flat crimps.

I may look at using crimp covers for my next beading project – another change!

Chainmaille Mania (Part 3)

Here are a few designs that I came up with based on popular chainmaille weaves:

lil-owlL’il Owl is based on a Byzantine link. When a Byzantine segment is viewed from the top, it reminds me of a perched owl, so I decided to modify it and incorporate different metals and glass beads to make birdlike earrings. Here I’ve used solid copper, bronze and anodized aluminum and hung them on brass earwires. Anodized aluminum has a shiny, coloured coating added by the same process used to produce cookware. Since making these, I’ve acquired more earthtone colours such as brown, yellow and orange that will probably make the owl design a bit more obvious. Chainmaille earrings, especially those made of aluminum, are a joy to wear because they’re so lightweight!

big-blue-marbleUsing the captive technique, Big Blue Marble is a keychain of Japanese weave, caging a large glass marble in heavy-gauge aluminum rings. I had no pattern or specifications to work from; I just experimented until I got the proportions right. The marble is captured securely but still rotates, so it’s fun to play with and can be used as a worry stone! The fob hangs on a sturdy 3 in 3 aluminum chain. Aluminum chainmaille is quite hardy, but I now have stainless steel rings that would work well for this type of design and make it virtually indestructible.

I modified the European 4 in 1 weave with an element of my own to make this Fire & Ice ring, using two sizes of anodized aluminum and solid bronze rings instead of just one. The wide band is lightweight and flexible, rolls onto the finger and holds its shape.fire-iceIf you missed my previous two posts on making chainmaille jewellery, see Part One and Part Two here. If you are interested in purchasing any of my work, or would like to discuss a custom or personalized order, please contact me through my Etsy shop!