Changes

I’ve been making a few changes in my life lately and am in the midst of considering others. I can’t believe it’s been more than two months since I started my second part-time job. It’s challenging and I’m enjoying it, but the additional schedule, including dashing straight from one job to the other several days a week, leaves precious little time for much else these days. I’m rethinking my presence on Facebook and must find a way to devote more time to my Etsy shop as well as take care of all the other things on my to-do list.

One thing that won’t change is my dedication to this blog. Some of you may have noticed in recent comments that I’ve switched my WordPress public display name from Wood So Wild to gillyflower. Over the last ten months, my blog has developed its own character, separate from my Etsy persona, and I would dearly love to change the site address, too, to reflect this. But WordPress doesn’t make that easy – or free – according to what I’ve read, so I’ll have to research that further. Have any of you changed your site name (e.g. http://www.gillyflowerfaire.wordpress.com), and how did you go about it?

With all this and more on my mind, May’s theme is Changes.

The other day, I picked up a sandalwood stretch bead bracelet. It was okay-looking but a bit too big, and the thin elastic looked as if it wouldn’t endure more than one wearing. Plus, I wasn’t keen on the cheap base metal charm or rhinestones. (I’ve saved the two genuine ruby fuchsite beads for another project.) I really just bought the thing for the fragrant wooden beads. So, just like Lydia and her ugly hat in Pride and Prejudice, I took it apart and made (what I think is) a prettier one!

Before

After

I used the following components, most of them available from Michael’s:

• 49 strand Beadalon™ 0.46 mm bright bead stringing wire
• 7 mm sandalwood beads
• 8 mm turquoise-dyed howlite beads
• 6 mm silver-plated spacer beads
• 5 mm and 3 mm silver-plated beads to finish the ends of the bracelet
• #2 silver-plated crimp tubes
• 18 gauge, 5/32” (4.19 mm) stainless steel chainmaille jump ring
• 12 mm silver-plated lobster clasp

Instructions on making jewellery with stringing wire and crimps are all over the ’net, so I won’t include them here. However, here are a few tips (some of them optional) in case you want to try something like this for yourself:

To accommodate the larger size of the beads on the wrist, I made the bracelet about half to three quarters of an inch longer than I would normally wear • I prefer using saw-cut chainmaille rings – a specialty purchase – in my jewellery because they’re more robust than regular jump rings and close beautifully without the need for soldering; I file the seam using a tiny round jeweller’s file for a virtually invisible closure • Chainmaille pliers are an excellent choice for jewellery-making because they don’t have teeth to mar metal surfaces, but they’re also not usually found at regular craft stores • My crimping pliers (Mighty Crimp) from Michael’s don’t secure the tiny tubes well enough, so I used needle nose pliers to tighten them securely, which resulted in flat crimps.

I may look at using crimp covers for my next beading project – another change!

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